Punjab Times

To fight ‘evil’ ICE, an engineer pulled his code off Github

Immigration Silicon Valley

Immigration Silicon Valley

When engineer Seth Vargo found that a company using his open-source code worked with US Immigrations and Customs Enforcement, he pulled the code off Github. The company, enterprise software maker Chef, found that, without the code, its business ground to a halt.

Vargo had worked for the Seattle-based company, but he didn’t know about the contract with ICE until tech writer Shanley Kane tweeted about it on Monday. ICE, which was formed under the presidency of George W. Bush in 2003, has stirred protests as it ratcheted up deportation and family separation policies under President Donald Trump.

hey @chef can you please provide a statement on your $100k contract with ICE, as documented here: https://t.co/x1awrUmVEt

— shanley (@shanley) S…

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PayPal reinstates controversial policy of pocketing fees from refunds

Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge

PayPal is reinstating a controversial policy around its handling of fees in the event of a refund. Starting next month, PayPal will begin pocketing the initial 2.9 percent commission fee sellers forfeit during a transaction even when the seller is refunding a customer in full.

The company initially rolled out this policy back in April, but seller backlash over PayPal claiming the commission fee led it to reverse course. Now, PayPal says it’s updating its policy for good, citing its “cost structure” and claiming the approach to refunds is in line with industry practice. Sellers are again up in arms over the change, with some claiming that it is not in fact the case that the online payment processing industry handles refunds like this.

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YouTube backtracks on taking badges away from creators after outcry

Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge

YouTube is almost completely backtracking on the verification system changes it announced yesterday. All YouTubers who are currently verified will get to keep their verification status, and YouTubers who are not yet verified will still be able to apply for it once they hit 100,000 subscribers, as creators have in the past.

Only a single key change isn’t being reversed: YouTube will actually verify that channels are authentic, whereas in the past it seemingly has not thoroughly taken this very obvious step.

This is all quite different from the original plan. YouTube had indicated it was going to limit verification to only established brands and the biggest personalities — people who were at high risk of impersonation. It meant that the…

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