Category: Science

Could Mario Kart teach us how to reduce world poverty and improve sustainability?

Could Mario Kart teach us how to reduce world poverty and improve sustainability?

A new study shows how the principles of Mario Kart — especially the parts of it that make the game fun for players — can be applied to reduce world poverty and improve sustainability in farming and agriculture. …read more

COVID-19 causes ‘unexpected’ cellular response in the lungs, research finds

COVID-19 causes ‘unexpected’ cellular response in the lungs, research finds

Scientists have discovered a surprising response in lung cells infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus, which might explain why the disease is so difficult to treat. The researchers suggest testing a new pairing of drugs to combat the disease. …read more

Engineering researchers visualize the motion of vortices in superfluid turbulence

Engineering researchers visualize the motion of vortices in superfluid turbulence

Researchers have managed to visualize the vortex tubes in a quantum fluid, findings that could help researchers better understand turbulence in quantum fluids and beyond. …read more

Rewriting evolutionary history and shape future health studies

Rewriting evolutionary history and shape future health studies

The network of nerves connecting our eyes to our brains is sophisticated and researchers have now shown that it evolved much earlier than previously thought, thanks to an unexpected source: the gar fish. …read more

New pig brain maps facilitate human neuroscience discoveries

New pig brain maps facilitate human neuroscience discoveries

For nearly a decade, scientists have relied on an MRI-based map, or atlas, of the pig brain – developed using 4-week-old pigs – to understand where and how nutrients and other interventions affect the developing brain. Now, scientists have updated that atlas, increasing its resolution by a factor of four, and they have also added a new atlas for adolescent 12-week-old pigs. …read more

One of Africa’s rarest primates protected by… speedbumps

One of Africa’s rarest primates protected by… speedbumps

A new study revealed that a drastic reduction of deaths of one of Africa’s rarest primates, the Zanzibar red colobus (Piliocolobus kirkii), followed the installation of four speedbumps along a stretch of road where the species frequently crossed. …read more

One in ten have long-term effects 8 months following mild COVID-19

One in ten have long-term effects 8 months following mild COVID-19

Eight months after mild COVID-19, one in ten people still has at least one moderate to severe symptom that is perceived as having a negative impact on their work, social or home life, according to a new study. The most common long-term symptoms are a loss of smell and taste and fatigue. …read more

Surgical sutures inspired by human tendons

Surgical sutures inspired by human tendons

Sutures are used to close wounds and speed up the natural healing process, but they can also complicate matters by causing damage to soft tissues with their stiff fibers. To remedy the problem, researchers have developed innovative tough gel sheathed (TGS) sutures inspired by the human tendon. …read more

Reflecting sunlight could cool the Earth’s ecosystem

Reflecting sunlight could cool the Earth’s ecosystem

Researchers explored the effect of solar climate interventions on ecology. The team emphasizes that greenhouse gas emissions reduction and conservation of biodiversity and ecosystem functions must be the priority. …read more

Clinical trial completion rates decline during COVID-19 pandemic

Clinical trial completion rates decline during COVID-19 pandemic

Social distancing and lockdowns may have affected clinical researchers’ ability to finish trials, researchers report. Study completion rates dropped worldwide between 13 percent and 23 percent, depending on the type of research sponsor and geographic location, between April and October 2020. …read more